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THE MARINE THERMAL SURVEILLANCE GROUP

I formed the Marine Thermal Surveillance Group from interested friends, designed a catchy logo to put on polo shirts for them, and loaded up my GPS with the current nautical charts.

Picked up in Bellingham, WA

Picked up in Bellingham, WA

Then I chartered 27’ Sea Scout in Bellingham, Washington, for a month and drove it 120 miles north to Secret Harbor, BC, at the northern end of the Sechelt Rapids. My idea was to use the boat as a platform to thermal the tidal flats at night. We could be quite a distance offshore and cover a wide area with the imager, while, hopefully, not alarming any squatchs foraging on the beach.

Landslide

Landslide

The scenery is breathtaking, when the fog and rain stops long enough to enjoy it. The mountains come steeply down to the water’s edge in most places, and continue just as steeply underwater. The result is that most of the coast, even in close to shore, has water so deep it is impossible to anchor. I’m talking hundreds of feet.

The weather constantly changed

The weather constantly changed

Matt Moneymaker and I walked the shores near Sechelt, BC and found few empty shells. Curious, we asked a gardener working nearby where all the shell fish were (We thought it was low tide, as the beach was so wide). He laughed and told us to come back at low tide, when the beach would be over a hundred yards wide, and covered with just what we were looking for.

In the woods NE of Sechelt, BC

In the woods NE of Sechelt, BC

I later found, a few miles up in the woods from there in a spot where people wouldn’t normally go, a pile of clam shells. I admit I’m at a loss to figure out how anyone or anything could carry so many clams with their bare arms, unless they were very big arms. I also was concerned with a seasonal and intermittent influx of algae called the Red Tide. This deadly nerve toxin is the frequent cause of regional closing of shellfish harvesting in BC and warnings are posted everywhere. You do not want to get Red Tide poisoning, and I can only wonder how the Squatchs deal with it, since they can’t read very well.

Flower covered housebarges, Gibson's, BC

Flower covered housebarges, Gibson's, BC

I added this photograph solely because it was so pretty. Gibson's, just South of Sechelt, is a picturesque place, made famoous in Canada as the home of their TV series, "THE BEACHCOMBER"

Seachelt Inlet

Seachelt Inlet

At Secret Harbor

At Secret Harbor

With occasional trips back to Secret Harbor for fuel and provisions we covered hundreds of miles of shoreline. Secret Harbor is at the top of the Jervis Inlet, We ran up all the inlets to the North and East, including into Princess Louisa Inlet, a tourist seaplane spot, famous for it’s large waterfall and towering cliffs. We went south into the Sechelt inlet and it’s two arms which reach far to the East. The rapids into Sechelt Inlet are impassable, except at slack tide, Here the water narrows to a few hundred feet wide and the tidal flow is so fierce it makes the passage too treacherous to attempt.

Deep in Salmon Arm, off the Sechelt Inlet

Deep in Salmon Arm, off the Sechelt Inlet

In the photographs you will notice the lack of crew. They have wished to remain anonymous for business reasons and I must respect their privacy.

Docked in the Princess Louisa Inlet

Docked in the Princess Louisa Inlet

Looking forward

Looking forward

Rumor has it that Deserted Bay is Indian land, but the Indians were so disturbed by Bigfoot activity that they moved to civilization and abandoned their village and fields. We found no sign of a village, but indeed the land was large, fertile and flat.
We also found no sign of Bigfoot, day or night.

One of hundreds of seals

One of hundreds of seals

There were Red Tide notices up at the dock in Secret Harbor and Sechelt. Did this account for the lack of activity? I would like to think so. There must be some way Sasquatches can detect this poison, otherwise I would think it would wipe them out.

More Images from this expidition...

Ashore at Deserted Bay

Ashore at Deserted Bay

Deserted Bay was different. Here the beach sloped out gently, and hundreds of seals basked when the sun came out. At night the plankton in the water phosphoresces when disturbed, and curious seals would approach the boat, looking like glowing torpedoes.

Mike and John Greene,2007

Mike and John Greene,2007

Big waterfall, tiny sailboat

Big waterfall, tiny sailboat

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